Wine Thieves-Do What You Like

Rob and I were chatting a while back before I started full time here at NY Vintners. We were talking shop and career paths…really deep stuff. Anyway, at this point in my life I was confused about what I wanted and where I was going. I had quit one job after a year and was ready to quit the next job in less time than that… things were just not clicking. That was when Rob said something that kind of stuck with me. He said, “Ya know Callie, in life you can do one of two things. You can work at a job that you don’t really enjoy and make a lot of money, or you can go and do something that you’re really passionate about and maybe make…not as much.” I had to think about this. I mean, A) I’m 24 years old just starting out in the “real worldâ€? and B) I live in New York City…so you can safely assume that I wasn’t doing much of anything that I loved and it was a good month if my bank account still had $11 bucks in it.

Needless to say, I took the job I’m passionate about and here I am. What I like about this industry is that wine is alive and constantly changing. I’m no expert when it comes to wine or food, but I’m catching on. The main thing is that I’m learning and I enjoy what I’m learning. For instance, last week I learned that sur lie is not a place in France where Muscadet is grown, but actually a special step within the fermentation process where the wine is bottled directly from the lees (sediment) left of the bottom of the barrel. Typically, this process is used in the production of French dry white muscadet to enhance flavor and texture of the wine. The sur lees method is becoming increasingly popular and has spread throughout the Languedoc, and even into South Africa. As it turns out, this process makes for a pretty tasty wine. If you want to try some out (it’s a great medium bodied winter wine) we recommend the Domaine Tourmaline muscadet from the Loire Valley, France. Of course, actually getting to taste the wine isn’t that bad either. Salute!

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